I’m sitting at a hockey game a few weeks after interviewing Movember co-founder, Adam Garone.

An announcer saunters onto the ice in heels – a dangerous game to be playing in my opinion – and proceeds with a contest sponsored by Campbell’s Soup in honour of Movember. ‘Name that Mo’’ and the contestant proceeds to name famous hockey mo’s correctly, four for four, which get him a chunk of money donated to his Mo’ Space, and, I’m assuming, a can of chunky soup.

Only one of the players featured in the contest played for the Leafs after 1990, and his is a sad attempt at a stash. The decades-long gap is conspicuously hairless in the upper lip region and the older players get by far the most vocal support by the fans. I’m struck with the realization, one that I’m sure most of you have already caught on to, of the intense generational nostalgia prevalent in our society.

The culture of a time when mo bros didn’t pray for December 1st so they could ditch the itchy lip sweater, but rather groomed and perfumed (maybe, but I like the rhyme) their moustaches. This nostalgia – for free wheelin’ ride or die, dazed and confused times, is what led Movember to succeed in the first place.

Movember is a well crafted joke by Adam Garone and his buddies that just happened to evolve into a global initiative. “What ever happened to the mo’?” Garone & Co. asked each other, over what I can only assume was copious amounts of alcohol. Movember cofounders include Travis Garone, Luke Slattery, and Justin Coghlan.

What happened to the mo’? When did our society eschew facial hair in favour of baby faced models and cultural icons? What happened to the manly men of yesteryear? Put an axe in my hands and dress me in plaid – I’m growing a mo’.

Adam arrives at the photography studio in Toronto with an entourage of three – its just before November and he is making the rounds at the Movember kick off parties, Toronto’s having happened two days before.

I’m sitting at a hockey game a few weeks after interviewing Movember co-founder, Adam Garone. An announcer saunters onto the ice in heels – a dangerous game to be playing in my opinion – and proceeds with a contest sponsored by Campbell’s Soup in honour of Movember. ‘Name that Mo’’ and the contestant proceeds to name famous hockey mo’s correctly, four for four, which get him a chunk of money donated to his Mo’ Space, and, I’m assuming, a can of chunky soup. Only one of the players featured in the contest played for the Leafs after 1990, and his is a sad attempt at a stash. The decades-long gap is conspicuously hairless in the upper lip region and the older players get by far the most vocal support by the fans. I’m struck with the realization, one that I’m sure most of you have already caught on to, of the intense generational nostalgia prevalent in our society. The culture of a time when mo bros didn’t pray for December 1st so they could ditch the itchy lip sweater, but rather groomed and perfumed (maybe, but I like the rhyme) their moustaches. This nostalgia – for free wheelin’ ride or die, dazed and confused times, is what led Movember to succeed in the first place. Movember is a well crafted joke by Adam Garone and his buddies that just happened to evolve into a global initiative. “What ever happened to the mo’?” Garone & Co. asked each other, over what I can only assume was copious amounts of alcohol. Movember cofounders include Travis Garone, Luke Slattery, and Justin Coghlan. What happened to the mo’? When did our society eschew facial hair in favour of baby faced models and cultural icons? What happened to the manly men of yesteryear? Put an axe in my hands and dress me in plaid – I’m growing a mo’. Adam arrives at the photography studio in Toronto with an entourage of three – its just before November and he is making the rounds at the Movember kick off parties, Toronto’s having happened two days before.
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